Long time no boardgaming

It’s been a whole month since I’ve last attended a boardgames night with the guys at work. I missed one because I was on vacation to State College, and the others were missed because of horrible weather. But I didn’t miss this week’s gaming night and I got to try out 2 new games: Isle of Skye and Evolution.

Isle of Skye

The game has a definite Carcassonne feel to it mixed in with Kingdom Builder. In Isle of Skye, you build your own personal territory stemming off your castle. Tiles get added on in the same way as in Carcassoonne: terrains have to match on the edges, however, roads do not have to.

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You receive 3 tiles at the start of each round, which you reduce down to two by discarding one. You then put a price on the other two. That piece is available to all players at that price or available to you at that price if nobody is interested. After the buying phase is over, money is paid to the bank for whichever remaining pieces you have and you get to place your tiles.

Scoring for this game is based off certain rules chosen at the start of the game. There are 6 rounds with different scoring rules, the rules we were governed by were:

  • Each sheep is worth 1 VP.
  • Completed terrains of at least 3 are worth 3 VP each.
  • Each square of 4 pieces are worth 2 VP (squares can be counted more than once).
  • Each vertical column of at least 3 are worth 3 VP each.

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Knowing this, I optimized my territory to score a lot of points.

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I’d probably recommend playing this game again with friends, it’s not too difficult to explain and didn’t take too long to play.

Evolution

The goal of evolution is to see who can eat the most food. You start off with 1 blank creature and you place trait cards to give the create new abilities. Trait cards can be abilities like climbing (cannot be attacked unless attacking creature has climbing) or burrowing (cannot be attacked if you have enough food to feed your population), traits like carnivore (cannot eat plants), scavenger (gain a food whenever a carnivore attacks), etc.

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You have the option to discard cards to increase your creature’s body size or population. Body size is needed to fend of carnivores while population is needed to increase your food intake per round.

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Plant food is plentiful to start the game but as more and more creatures are around, plants become scarce and carnivores thrive.

The game probably needs another play through another night. We were able to get the gist of the game but didn’t catch onto strategy until it was too late.

Foods….

Foods from the last trip to State College are being eaten and will be posted in some capacity soon.

January 7 Boardgames

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As promised, I will be doing a boardgame post every week or so starting in 2016. We play at Games On Tap in Waterloo every Thursday night. If you’re interested in joining our group, feel free to bug me personally somewhere on social mediums.

We played a few games last Thursday, Libertalia was the only game I haven’t played before. The game itself is pretty simple once you get the hang of it. Each player has the same roster of characters that they will strategically play in order to gain loot. Each character has special effects that will grant them abilities during specific phases of the round. The replay value exists because of the random nature of the character rosters you’ll get. Game can play up to 6 and the more players the better.

I introduced the group to Guillotine, a game published by Wizards of the Coast. I liked the game because of the very simple rules and concept. Guillotine has action cards (hand) and nobles (they form a line up in front of a guillotine). You play an action card to possibly manipulate the line up, and you collection the next noble in the line up. Loop until the line up is done, loop 3 times. Very easy game to explain.

We ended the night with Fluxx, a favourite of ours. The game is also another one of those simple to teach games and starts off with the basic rules of ‘Draw 1, Play 1’. The game doesn’t stay that way though, you’ll add more rules to complement the basic rule and you can end up drawing 5 cards and playing 3, or only allowed to keep 0 cards at the end of your turn. To win the game, one of the rules that will be added determine the conditions to win. Those conditions consist usually of having played keepers and sometimes creeper cards in front of you. The game quickly turns into a very complicated mess with too many rules on the table and someone screwing your winning conditions over.

I’m going to delay the Kit Kat post since I haven’t been able to secure a Mint one yet. However, I did happen to find some Ginger Ale and Root Beer at a grocery store that I don’t frequent in my hunt for the Mint Kit Kat.

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